The returning TV shows you should catch up on in 2024

The upcoming year on television is full of exciting new shows to jump into, whether it’s The 3 Body Problem, Shōgun, The Veil, or Manhunt. But once you get into all the returning shows, the 2024 lineup gets daunting. Sure you can start House of the Dragon, Silo, or Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power with just one season of homework to catch up, and shows like True Detective: Night Country and Orphan Black: Echoes you can jump into with no previous knowledge of the series — but what happens when a show’s going into its fourth or fifth season. How do you know if the commitment is worthwhile?

That’s what we’re here for today: To help you figure out what shows with new seasons in 2024 you should catch up on, and which ones might not be worth the effort. First things first, we’re counting out the easy ones: Big returning shows like The Boys, You, and Bridgerton are cultural phenomena that have been massive for years, so you probably know whether or not they’re for you. If one of them seems like your bag, start watching, but trust your gut instinct either way. As for everything else, here’s what you should know:

Summer (Busy Philips), Gloria (Paula Pell), and Dawn (Renée Elise Goldsberry) standing and looking disappointed at someone Image: Peacock

Watch it if you like: 30 Rock, or any sitcom with a constant barrage of hilarious and offbeat jokes
Previous seasons: Two
Where to watch: Peacock (Netflix after March 14)

This is an easy one. This sitcom about four women who used to be pop stars in a girl group is heading into its third season, and its first after moving from Peacock to Netflix. There are only 16 episodes in the first two seasons, and at just 30 hilarious minutes each, it’s easy to breeze through. —Austen Goslin

(L-R) Mike Colter as David Acosta, Aasif Mandvi as Ben Shakir and Katja Herbers as Kristen Bouchard of the Paramount+ series Evil. Image: CBS

Watch it if you like: Elementary, or any other offbeat procedural, or exorcism movies
Previous seasons: Three
Where to watch: Paramount Plus

From the minds behind all-time great legal procedural The Good Wife, Evil takes the elements of procedural shows we know and love and expertly applies them to the demonic and supernatural. Gleefully playful, surprisingly scary, and mischievously funny, Evil is unlike anything else on television. —Pete Volk

Jennifer Tilly as Jennifer Tilly sitting in court Image: Syfy

Watch it if you like: The Chucky movies, horror comedy, Jennifer Tilly
Previous seasons: Two-and-a-half
Where to watch: Peacock

Chucky is one of the boldest shows on television, never afraid to reinvent itself or dive into the deepest recesses of its canon. After seasons set in a quiet small town and a Catholic boarding school, the current season (in a mid-season break) is set in the freakin’ White House!! It’s one of the funniest shows on TV, and almost inarguably the goriest. Four more years! —PV

Jack Lowden and Gary Oldman talk in front of a secure area in Slow Horses Image: Apple TV Plus

Watch it if you like: Dry British humor, spies, fun television
Previous seasons: Three
Where to watch: Apple TV Plus

Slow Horses really started to catch on with the 2023 debut of its third season, but if you’re not on board yet, 2024 is the perfect time to catch up. The series centers around Slough House, essentially the island of misfit toys for disgraced British spies who are disdainfully called Slow Horses. The horses are led by Jackson Lamb, a fantastic spy with awful hygiene and a penchant for rudeness — played terrifically by Gary Oldman. Slow Horses’ third season was its best so far, which is saying something for one of the most fun and watchable shows on TV. —AG

The cast of Abbott Elementary talk in the teacher’s lounge. Photo: Ser Baffo/ABC

Watch it if you like: Sitcoms like Parks & Recreation, or generally sweet and funny shows
Previous seasons: Two
Where to watch: Hulu

Genuinely funny broadcast sitcoms feel like a rarity nowadays, but Abbott Elementary is doing a great job holding down the fort. Set in a Philadelphia elementary school, the growing roster of phenomenal guest stars helps keep each episode fresh, while the show lets its core cast of teachers grow as characters, friends, and more. Abbott isn’t the funniest sitcom ever, but it’s got a few great jokes every episode and as much heart and personality as any show on TV right now. —AG

Siegfried wears a wool suit and looks adoringly at a horse in All Creatures Great and Small. Image: PBS Masterpiece

Watch it if you like: Animals, British shows, procedurals
Previous seasons: Two
Where to watch: PBS All-Access

The latest adaptation of James Herriot’s books about being a veterinarian in the British countryside as World War II looms is equally tender, charming, and beautiful. Another example of applying the procedural format in an unlikely direction, All Creatures is about how we care for our community — human and animal alike — and it’s one of the best shows hidden away on PBS. —PV